What was life like for the soldiers during the war?  Here are some links to posts or web sites that describe life during the war by people that were there.  The picture above is taken in camp of the 31st Pennsylvania Infantry, of what may be the camp landress and her family, courtesy of the Smithsonian Archive.


The Volunteer’s Cook-Book

This book was transcribed by battery member Paul Rambow from a copy found at the Harold Washington Public Library in their Special Collections.  This book shows the incomplete understanding of nutrition and hygiene at the time, and the various ways the men could cook their meager rations.


Hardtack and Coffee

Written by John D. Billings, a member of the 10th Massachusetts Volunteer Light Artillery Battery, which recounts the sights, smells, and daily chores that soldiers put up with during the war in a most unglamorous light.  This book is public domain, so feel free to download a version to read at your leisure.


Ever wonder what the proportion of the various types of beards on both sides of the Civil War was? No, me neither but someone did and here are the results.

GROOMED FOR WAR: WHAT WAS THE BEARDIEST BATTLE OF THE CIVIL WAR?


Women played a large part in the war, despite being forbidden from fighting.  This article examines one of the ways that women could directly help the fighting men.

TUBS AND SUDS: CIVIL WAR LAUNDRESSES IN THE FIELD, CAMP AND HOSPITAL

If you found that interesting, then look at some of the other interesting books available. Ragged Soldier Sutlery and Vintage Volumes


Jas. Townsend & Son has a great series of videos on YouTube about life in the 17th and 18th centuries, mostly about cooking, food preservation, and clothing, but also interviews with historical reenactors and discussions about reenacting.

Also, check out their shop at http://www.jas-townsend.com